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The Urban American Indian Collective- FIND YOUR TRIBE!

The Earliest Faces of America Look More Like Modern "Black" Americans.

What is it that you're afraid "Black" Americans will benefit by admitting some of their ancestors are indigenous to America? Fear is the root cause of denial.


I saw this interesting post of Facebook from Knowledge of Self II page and wanted to expose some of the verifiable information with our readers. I remember in 1999 when the New YorkTimes published an article about the exact topic, so the information isn't new. Here's an excerpt:


APIUNA & LUZIA (Ancient Americans)


Some media chooses to post the question: Did Africans Discover America?


We'd rather acknowledge a global truth; that what you call modern day black people inhabited the entire planet in the distant past before Africa had a name. Those people can be called the aborigines of the planet. They're indigenous to every continent and while having different phenotypic features; they share a common trait: that of melanin rich shades of brown skin.


Colonial world view and social group think has a mental monopoly on the way we view the world and my goal is to shift it.


Lets explore more from the Facebook post:


Haplogroup Q is the predominant Y-DNA

haplogroup among modern Native Americans…


Haplogroup P is the direct paternal ancestor of haplogroup Q…


Haplogroup P is primarily found in indigenous populations of Melanesia, Southeast Asia, and parts of Oceania…


Haplogroup A is the direct paternal ancestor of Haplogroup P…


Haplogroup A is believed to have originated in Africa approximately 140,000 years ago…


Haplogroup A is found at high frequencies among certain indigenous populations of Africa, such as the San people (also known as Bushmen) of southern Africa…


Over time, descendants of haplogroup A migrated out of Africa and dispersed to different regions of the world, giving rise to various subclades and haplogroups, including haplogroup P…


“The earliest South Americans tend to be more similar to present Australians, Melanesians, and Sub-Saharan Africans”





Digital imaging by Brazilian graphic designer, Cicero Moraes, who is not of African decent himself, shows the features of a 40- to 50-year-old prehistoric man whose face resembles the “Negritos”


The reconstruction, nicknamed Apiuna, was based on a skull discovered deep inside a cave during an archaeological dig in Lagoa Santa, south east Brazil, some 50 years ago…


The discovery suggests that Apiuna was part of the first wave of people in America who were Africans with Austro-Melanesian characteristics…


Apiuna bears a close likeness to Luzia, the name given to the 11,500-year-old skull of a young African whose remains are the oldest ever found on the South American continent…


She was found to have similar ethnic characteristics to modern-day indigenous so called Sub-Saharan Africans, native Australians and Melanesians…


These two skulls appear to confirm a decades old argument that Africans were the first colonisers of the Americas…


Archaeologists believe there were at least two large migratory waves of distinctively different people who made the odyssey across the Bering Straits, the land bridge between Siberia and Alaska, reaching the American continent thousands of years before the first Europeans arrived…


Apiuna may have been in the first nomadic wave with Luzia…


The Siberian Asian Mongoloid groups trekked across in the second wave…


In the first wave, people arrived more than 30,000 years ago…


This migration was stemmed for 15,000 years because of ice blocking the route…


There was then a second wave when the route was clear…


And while modern Native Americans closely resemble people of Asian heritage, the oldest American skeletons do not…


The small number of early American specimens discovered so far have smaller and shorter faces and longer and narrower skulls…


This more closely resembles the modern people of Africa, Australia, and the South Pacific…


SOURCE;



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