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The Urban American Indian Collective- FIND YOUR TRIBE!

Unveiling The Savages Let Loose or The Cruel Fate of The Loyalists 1738: A Satirical Journey Through History

Fam, buckle up for a wild ride as we dive deep into the heart of history with a satirical gem from 1738, "The Savages Let Loose." Picture this: you're kickin' it in the British Museum or vibin' in the Library of Congress, and you stumble upon this piece of art that's more than just ink on paper—it's a whole vibe.


Now, let's rewind to 1738. The world was a different place, y'all. Colonization was in full swing, and the power dynamics were as twisted as a pretzel. Enter "The Savages Let Loose," a piece of satire that's as real as it gets. Back then, satire that's as real as it gets. Back then, satire was like the OG meme—using humor to throw shade at society's nonsense.

So, what's the deal with "The Savages Let Loose"? Well, imagine a bunch of colonizers sippin' their tea, actin' all high and mighty while the indigenous folks are portrayed as wild animals runnin' amok. It's like a twisted reality show where the loyalists get the short end of the stick.

about exposing the cruelty and injustice of colonization. It's a wake-up call wrapped in humor, a reminder that history ain't always rainbows and butterflies. It was used to invoke fear in European for indigenous americans.

Fast forward to today, and "The Savages Let Loose" still packs a punch. It's a reminder to stay woke and never forget the struggles of those who came before us. History ain't just about dates and names; it's about stories—real, raw, and sometimes, downright savage.But here's the kicker: behind the laughs lies a harsh truth. This print ain't just about poking fun; it's about exposing the cruelty and injustice of colonization. It's a wake-up call wrapped in humor, a reminder that history was never rainbows and butterflies.


So, next time you're strollin' through the museum or scrollin' through the library archives, keep an eye out for "The Savages Let Loose." It's more than just a piece of paper; it's a testament to the resilience of indigenous peoples and a call to action for a better future. Stay woke, y'all. Note how indigenous american are depicted in 1738.


Sources:

British Museum


Library of Congress

 

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